Bringing the learning home (Australian Learning & Teaching Council)

US of A

I’ve been in the States for about three months now, and I’ve learned:

  • to sharpen my “r”s, especially when introducing myself – I think “Clare” in an Australian accent sounds like “Clehhhhh…a”, so I am now “CleRR”, the American version of myself, who is about twenty pounds heavier because of the high fructose corn syrup in.. well, everything;
  • that the word “gig” is meaningless here;
  • that even by American standards, Vegas is regarded as a city full of trash-ed and trash-y people (think 24/7 deep-fried cheese sticks with ranch dipping sauce);
  • that America is a lot more classist that Australia, with a more clearly defined class structure, a much larger low/working class who are often severely or noticeably economically disadvantaged, and less movement between classes;
  • that college campuses turn into drunken orgies on the weekends, regardless of the drinking age, and that at 24, I seem to be the oldest undergrad on campus;
  • a different way to learn – as someone posted earlier, the classes here are five days a week and there’s a stack of small assignments throughout the semester; in my classes, participation is worth a fair amount, and often there’s an expectation of a weekly response (written, oral or online) to readings so you can’t get away with skipping readings like at home; the assignments are also less research-based and more critical, which is entirely different to the way I normally work; overall, I feel a bit like I’ve been sent back to high school, with the excitement over binge drinking, daily classes and these expectations of how to engage with coursework;
  • a lot about “the American dream” and “mythology – I’m taking three classes of American literature, two of which study the classics and the beginnings of an American identity, and another which is about contemporary African-American lit. I expected more blind patriotism, more active belief in the supriority of America as “land of the free, home of the brave” etc., but actually the idea of the American dream seems to be something existing only in the hopes of the citizens and maintained for the benefit of one another and as a facade for the rest of the world. It could just be that I’m here at a bad or unusual time (recession, support for the War here and abroad waning, Americans generally becoming more aware of the way they’re perceived) which has made everyone more disillusioned.

One of the most memorable things that has happened so far (I think it’s such a favourite because it seemed like it was a lived experience of a Bukowski novel, which is part of this “American mythology” that I had formulated before I came here): getting on a Greyhound to go into NYC and listening to the conversation of two women behind me. One of the women had just been released from prison, at which point they apparently provide a bus ticket to anywhere and forty dollars cash; this woman was going to meet up with her friends who had also been serving time. The women had only met at the bus station, so they didn’t really know each other, but they formed this kind of friendship based on a combination of mutual sympathy and bravado – they had both obviously lived somewhat rough lives. The ex-con got off the bus in Scranton, Pennsylvania (which is where they set the American version of “The Office”, to give some clue as to the type of town it is..), and I somehow got sucked into a conversation with a woman (different woman, same bus), and it went something like this:

Woman: So you mighta noticed I’m missin’ my bottom teeth.

Me: Oh, um, no, I hadn-

Woman: Well, y’see, I had these false ones, the real ones got knocked out years ago.

Me: Oh, right. Cool. (I remember saying that and then realizing it didn’t make sense).

Woman: But, I – I got soooo drunk last weekend. Oh man, I puked them up! But it’s okay ‘coz MedicAid (the US version of Medicare) will get me a new set. I was going to get them before I left, but.. nah, fuck it. I’m only going to visit my sister.

At least, that’s how I remember it. And that’s all that matters in the end.

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2 responses

  1. Clare, glad my home country is giving you a warm, high fructose-powered welcome! Even Americans are well aware of the weight gain involved in going to college. We have an expression, ‘the freshman fifteen,’ for the weight gained by students who move onto campus and pack on the pounds when they change from home cooking to university dining halls.

    I’m struck by your experiences on the Greyhound, for a lot of reasons. Like you, when traveling overseas, I often traveled by bus and other means, whereas when at home, I would just drive my own car. When I was in Brazil, for example, I horrified other college-educated people by taking buses long distances. In the US, long-distance bus travel is really considered a rough way to go. One thing that the US really has NEVER figured out is good, cheap long distance travel through train or buses. It’s really only in a few corridors around the country (like DC to Boston) that you can do it easily.

    Tonia and I have been discussing the pronunciation of the name ‘Clare’ in the US and Australia. I always tease her and our daughter because they turn the last ‘R’ on words into an ‘h’ sound, but then they add an ‘R’ on the end of words that don’t have them! (E.g., the word ‘bra’ has an ‘r’ sound on the end of it.) Funny how the small changes can throw you off.

    October 21, 2010 at 9:11 pm

  2. jangothard

    Hi Clare with an R

    James Joyce said, ‘Imagination is memory’ – so you are in good company if imagination has coloured your recollections. Thank you for sharing your road trip with us.

    October 24, 2010 at 8:54 am

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